National Academies of Science – Thriving in the Innovation Economy through Collaborations of Government, Universities, and Industry

Thriving in the innovation economy demands a different approach to policy and programs.  It requires a higher degree of collaboration between government, universities, and industry, and the establishment of regional innovation networks to generate new jobs and wealth.  It requires economic development policies that will facilitate the movement of intellectual property and human capital between academia, industry, and our Federal labs and institutions.  Further, it needs to be sustainable.  Thriving in the innovation economy is a journey, not a one-time event.  It is the creation of a persistent regional collective intelligence that continuously produces the innovations that are the foundation of a lasting competitive advantage.  This talk presents a new approach using Innovation Network Mapping, and the concept of an Innovation Genotype™, to accomplish these objectives.

On 2/28/17 GUIRR held a workshop to discuss Innovation Network Mapping and how to build regional collective intelligence to drive innovation and economic growth with Gary Markovits, cofounder and CEO of Innovation Business Partners, Inc., an organization that helps high-growth companies; laboratories and governments increase their capacity for innovation.

Innovation Network Based Economic Development

Abstract: For many regions of our nation the “old economy”, which we depended upon for decades, either doesn’t exist anymore, or is rapidly fading away. The new economy, the innovation economy, demands a new approach to economic policy and programs. It requires a higher degree of collaboration between government, academia, and the private sector, and the establishment of regional innovation networks, ecosystems, to generate new jobs and wealth. It requires economic development policies that will facilitate the movement of intellectual property and trained human capital from academia to the private sector, and leverages the inventions of our Federal labs and institutions. Further, this process needs to be sustainable. Thriving in the innovation economy is a journey, not a one-time event. It is the creation of a persistent regional collective intelligence that continuously produces the innovations that are the foundation of our competitiveness.

This white paper demonstrates the value of using Innovation Network Mapping and Innovation Genotype™ analysis to inform economic development efforts. These techniques enable economic developers to identify the technological strengths of academic, commercial, and government organizations within a city, region, or state. They enable identification of important technical domains, specific organizations, and key individuals, which if joined in collaborative networks, create a force to accelerate economic development. Finally, when combined with several network-based mechanisms for economic development, it results in the creation of a larger regional collective intelligence to drive job creation and wealth generation.
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What’s In Your Innovation Backbone?

Authors: Dr. Morton Tavel, Mike Jensen, Gary Markovits, Devin Markovits & Blake Markovits

Facebook and Twitter are popular and successful examples of social media. Successes made possible by their underlying network structure. Networks enable connections and interactions that only a generation ago were impossible. Today, network insights are being used to understand complex systems such as disease epidemics, the electric grid and consumer adoption behaviors.

Why use networks to study innovation? No doubt innovation has a high degree of social content. Many innovations are created by the social interaction of groups and similarly, innovations are adopted by consumers in a socially based manner. So, it is reasonable that a network model should provide powerful insights.
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