National Academies of Science – Thriving in the Innovation Economy through Collaborations of Government, Universities, and Industry

Thriving in the innovation economy demands a different approach to policy and programs.  It requires a higher degree of collaboration between government, universities, and industry, and the establishment of regional innovation networks to generate new jobs and wealth.  It requires economic development policies that will facilitate the movement of intellectual property and human capital between academia, industry, and our Federal labs and institutions.  Further, it needs to be sustainable.  Thriving in the innovation economy is a journey, not a one-time event.  It is the creation of a persistent regional collective intelligence that continuously produces the innovations that are the foundation of a lasting competitive advantage.  This talk presents a new approach using Innovation Network Mapping, and the concept of an Innovation Genotype™, to accomplish these objectives.

On 2/28/17 GUIRR held a workshop to discuss Innovation Network Mapping and how to build regional collective intelligence to drive innovation and economic growth with Gary Markovits, cofounder and CEO of Innovation Business Partners, Inc., an organization that helps high-growth companies; laboratories and governments increase their capacity for innovation.

Innovation Network Based Economic Development

Abstract: For many regions of our nation the “old economy”, which we depended upon for decades, either doesn’t exist anymore, or is rapidly fading away. The new economy, the innovation economy, demands a new approach to economic policy and programs. It requires a higher degree of collaboration between government, academia, and the private sector, and the establishment of regional innovation networks, ecosystems, to generate new jobs and wealth. It requires economic development policies that will facilitate the movement of intellectual property and trained human capital from academia to the private sector, and leverages the inventions of our Federal labs and institutions. Further, this process needs to be sustainable. Thriving in the innovation economy is a journey, not a one-time event. It is the creation of a persistent regional collective intelligence that continuously produces the innovations that are the foundation of our competitiveness.

This white paper demonstrates the value of using Innovation Network Mapping and Innovation Genotype™ analysis to inform economic development efforts. These techniques enable economic developers to identify the technological strengths of academic, commercial, and government organizations within a city, region, or state. They enable identification of important technical domains, specific organizations, and key individuals, which if joined in collaborative networks, create a force to accelerate economic development. Finally, when combined with several network-based mechanisms for economic development, it results in the creation of a larger regional collective intelligence to drive job creation and wealth generation.
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Innovation Network Time Lapse – NSWCCD 1963-2010

The following time lapse movie depicts the growth of a government laboratory’s innovation network from the time frame of 1963 to 2010. The innovation network is comprised of 705 lab employees who filed 685 patents during that time. Each node in the network represents an employee and a link between any two nodes represents one or more inventions in which they were co-inventors.
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Culture of Innovation as Collective Intelligence

We begin by assuming that cultures are created or emerge for a reason. Culture is a means to an end, not the end in itself. Great leaders begin by clearly defining and communicating why their organizations exist and create a culture that can achieve this purpose.

We propose that the power of organizational culture lies in its ability to create a collective intelligence that can acquire and apply knowledge and skills at a rate far exceeding that of any individual. This power derives from the organization’s shared tacit knowledge, collective explicit knowledge, acceptable behavior patterns, and the structure of the underlying social network that contains the organization’s social capital. A culture of innovation is the means by which great leaders create a collective intelligence capable of attaining the organization’s higher purpose in any environment.
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Identifying Potentially Disruptive Innovators

Abstract: This paper examines new ways to extract more insights from the invention networks. We have developed a way of graphing the social influence, diversity of thought and creative intensity of inventors that visually identifies people that we believe are more likely to be the source of disruptive innovations and/or influential subject matter experts.

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Generating and Sustaining a Culture of Innovation for the Navy’s Pit Crew at Lakehurst

Designing a culture that helps leadership to enable everyone in the organization to think the thoughts, talk the talk, and walk the walk that will produce the desired results has been the mission of NAVAIR’s Support Equipment & Aircraft Launch and Recovery (SE & ALRE) Department.

NAVAIR SE & ALRE has recently begun applying the Culture as Collective Intelligence (CCI) model, which allows leadership to measure and justify investments in their innovation networks. CCI has six elements. The innermost element is the organization’s WHY, its enduring purpose or reason to exist. The outermost element is the WHAT, the products and services it produces to realize the WHY. The four elements of the middle ring comprise the organization’s culture – the collective intelligence that continuously produces new products and services to achieve its enduring purpose time and again in a volatile and changing world.
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Why Leaders Need to Do More Than Walk the Walk

Aphorisms endure because they capture sage advice in memorable phrases. Our question is what do some of the more enduring aphorisms and memorable quotes teach us about leadership?

Aphorisms are built upon analogies that concisely capture complex ideas. The power of analogies lies in their ability to explain something less familiar in terms of something more familiar[1]. For example, the analogies expressed in the aphorisms “talk is cheap”, “practice what you preach”, and “actions speak louder than words[2]”, enable us to map the known concept of monetary or moral value to speech and position the relative value of speech and behavior in human relationships[3]. These same relationships are embodied in the popular aphorism about leadership which states that it is not enough for leaders to “talk the talk” they must also “walk the walk”. Yes, leaders inspire people through their oratory skills[4], but it is their actions that build trust and inspire followers to action[5].
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